Posts Tagged ‘Pogo’

“Turning in his grave”

Posted: February 14, 2017 in Ramblings
Tags: ,

For years…probably since I read my first Pogo book at about age 8…I have understood this expression as Walt Kelly did.  Let’s have an example.

“This concert is so bad that Beethoven must be turning in his grave!”

Kelly explained (through his characters) that this meant “things are so bad that Beethoven is turning his grave in.”  Returning it, so that he could come back to life and either punish the person playing the music, or play it himself correctly.  He is “turning it in” or exchanging it for a different situation.

Recently I reread this phrase in Pogo so I went online to look it up.  I can’t find a single thing to corroborate this!  Everything on the internet talks about “spinning” in his grave, or “rotating,” never mind that those don’t even make any sense.  I hesitate to put Kelly’s version on Wikipedia (even as an alternate interpretation), mostly because I feel unqualified to tinker with Wikipedia.  I’m not enough of an expert to claim the precise knowledge.  (Not to mention I can’t quite concisely phrase it.  You see how rambling it came out in this blog post.)

So I was wondering…for those of you who do not know Kelly’s work – have you ever heard of his version?  Has anyone else ever heard of this, besides Pogo fans?

Calendars

Posted: January 8, 2017 in Ramblings
Tags: , , , ,

It’s time for another one of my philosophical rants.

Why does February only have 28 days?  I realize for the true answer to this question I’d have to time-travel back to Caesar’s Rome, when the current calendar was set, but it still bugs me.  Why didn’t they pilfer 2 days from the ’31-day’ months and whack them into February to make it 30 days?  February could still be the leap year month by turning it into a 31-day month in leap years.  It just seems so sloppy.

In “Pogo,” Churchy is constantly trying to reform the calendar (usually into an entire year of October, because that’s when his birthday is), and I read two different sequences about that, last week.  Then today I’m reading John Maddox Roberts’ “The Year of Confusion,” which deals with Caesar’s implementation of the new calendar.  So this got me thinking, and this is why I came to write this post.